Welcome to CSC!

The Cal Sailing Club is a non-profit, volunteer-run sailing club in Berkeley

Membership costs just $99 for 3 months ($89 for students and seniors) plus 2 hours volunteer work and there are no charges for lessons, equipment use, cruises, or other club activities.  Choose About CSC for more information, to join, See plans and pricing.

Once you've signed up, you'll need your Membership #  from your invoice or confirmation email.  If you forget that, check with the dayleader (they have the list of current members) or better yet, login again with your username and password and go to Account Info .  

Welcome aboard! Welcome to CSC!

General Membership Meeting this Sunday, August 12, starting at 6:00 pm in yard

Come help out at Open House in the afternoon and join us for dinner and officer reports in the evening. See you there!

PS Stella's report on the club finances for the 5/1 - 7/31/18 quarter can be read here.

The Last Junior Fast Track this Year: August 20 - August 24

Make that final push for your Junior Rating! Fast Track is a focused week of intense practice to help students who have had several lessons to pass their Junior Test. Couldn't get into the July one, well here's your last chance for the season.

Prerequisites (must be completed and signed off by docktime on Sunday, July 29):

- Junior Written Test

- Rigging Test

- 2 extra volunteer(total of 4, including quarterly membership requirement)

- Strongly recommended - at least 3 lessons and have practiced all basic maneuvers

You must commit to all 5 nights of lessons (and teach if you make Junior early), help with cleanup, and kick in $25 for drinks (the Club pays for food).

To sign up, fill out the form here.

Juniors/Seniors/All Members - Sign up and volunteer to COOK/EACH/TEST for big hour credits - watch the list for the announcement.

Advanced Dinghy Classes for 2018, Starting May Adv Dinghy Image

Advanced Dinghy will start of Monday,  May 7, and will be held on every Monday evening from then until the end of August, except for US holidays and Fast Track weeks. These classes are intended for Junior Skippers working on their Senior rating. They will cover the required skills and much more. Here are the classes for August:

  • August 6 - If you don't need a rudder, why do we have one?
  • August 13 - How to survive 30 knots, or, what to do if you’ve bitten off more than you can chew?
  • August 27 - Performance dinghies - Laser and RS-500

 

CSC Promotional Video - Check it Out

Courtesy Min Lee (his Senior Project).

Junior Skipper Fast Track Dates for 2018

We will be offering five Junior Skipper Fast Tracks this year. These are 5 day (Monday through Friday) intensive dinghy lessons, 1 on 2, from around 5pm to sunset. They are designed to move you closer to your Junior Skipper rating (which you may even get that week, but even if you don't, you'll be a much better sailor at the end of the week). Details will be announced within a few weeks of the start of each. Participants should have all Junior requirements completed except for the on-the-water test.

These are the dates:

  • April 30 - May 4
  • June 4 - 8
  • June 25 - 29
  • July 30 - August 3
  • August 20 - 24

Open House Dates for 2018

During Open Houses we offer FREE introductory sails to the general public aboard our fleet of keelboats and dinghies. Children must be at least 5 years of age and accompanied by an adult. Each Open House runs from 1-4pm on the dates listed above. More detailed information is here.

Please try to arrive promptly at 1 pm when the signups start.  Depending on the conditions and the amount of people, the sign-up/rides may end before 4pm.Come on down and get out on the bay! Already a member? Come on down and help out! The 2018 Open House Schedule is below:

  • Sunday, February 4
  • Sunday, March 11
  • Saturday, April 14 - Coincides with the Berkeley Bay Festival! 
  • Sunday, May 13
  • Sunday, June 17
  • Sunday, July 15
  • Sunday, August 12
  • Sunday, September 16
  • Sunday, October 14
  • Sunday, November 11 

 

Where to go from here

I can't end on 13, that would be unlucky and might kill the wind! So where do you go from here?

Actually, you have just begun to lean to windsurf. The fun has just begun. I have been sailing for about 30 years, and every time I go out on the water, I learn something new.

Consider a windsurfing vacation. There are fabulous places to visit. Combine a vacation with lessons (for example, Vela Resorts) or a windsurfing clinic (example, ABK Sports Clinics).

There are a lot of windsurfing DVD's from instruction to action. Every winter, to get through SAD (Sailing Addiction Disorder) I buy myself a video and try to go on a windsurfing vacation. It's about the same price as psychotherapy, but more fun.

Learn Free Style Tricks. There are many site on the web that teach free-style. I have listed some of the easier tricks that you can do when just begin to windsurf in the Free Style section below.

Windsurfing magazines are a good source on information and usually have instructional hints for every level of skill. There is also information about clinics and windsurfing vacation spots.

Most localities have a local sailboard association. Join the association/club in your area. You will get a newsletter, meet some great people, and help improve the sailing sites in your area.

Support your local shop. A local shop can be the focus of activity for clinics, manufacture demos, swap meets, etc.

Surf the web. There are dozens and dozens of windsurfing related sites including bulletin boards. One of the best is maintained by iWindsurf.com.

 

Sail Hard, Have Fun!

 

 



Free Style

In 1976 at the North American Championships, sailors had heard that a 13 year old kid from Oahu could sail pretty well. However, this skinny kid blew everyone away in the free style by calmly flipping his board on its side, standing on the rail, and sailing away. The kid was Robby Naish, the place was Berkeley, California. The sport has never been the same since.

Here are some tricks to get started (from easy to difficult):

Sail Clew First. The easiest way to get into this position is to not flip the sail after jibing. A more interesting way is as follows: While sailing on a reach, first move both hands back on the boom. Reach your front hand back across your back hand to the end of the boom. Flip the back of the boom forward and reach over on the other side of the boom. This maneuver will help you learn how to duck jibe.

Sail Downwind Tail First. Come head to wind as if you are tacking. Move in front of the mast and pull the sail perpendicular to the board (in the downwind position). Move out to the bow of the board in the sailing downwind position. The trick is to move far out on the bow of the board so that the skeg is out of the water. This maneuver is great practice that will help you do nonplaning jibes going the other way.

Pirouette. Sail on a beam reach in light wind. Move the sail across the board in front of the mast (the same position as when you started up, step 2). There is a position where the sail will almost balance on itself. After you find that position, let go of the boom, pivot on the balls of your feet (spin around 360 degrees), and quickly grab the boom.

Sail behind the mast. Step around the mast, and stand on the wrong side of the sail.

Sail 360deg. Begin as in the pirouette by finding the balance point of the sail, and then do the following: Swing tip of the mast toward the wind. Step forward of the mast on the leeward side of the mast, pushing the clew in front of you. Continue pushing the clew around and follow it until you have circled the mast. You must be quick!

Helitack. Start out as if you are doing a normal tack. When the board is pointing directly into the wind, instead of moving in front of the mast, push the clew forward and through the eye of the wind. In other words, you tack, but you stay behind the mast and the sail goes in front of it.

Head Dip. On a beam reach in strong wind, lean way back with your arms straight. Bend your knees as when you do the limbo and dip your head in the water. Try a leg drag (prequel to a body drag).

Splits (for the Gals). This trick is one even Robby couldn't do. Stretch out on shore. It helps to have your booms rigged lower than usual. Sail on a beam reach in a light wind and go for it.

Rail Ride (Robby's trick). While sailing along, reach one foot under the edge of the board and pop the board up on its edge, i.e., rail. (I kid you not!). At first you can sail with one foot on the centerboard, the other shin resting on the edge of the board. Then stand up with both feet on the edge of the board (rail).

Not to be outdone, a few years after Robby invented the rail ride, Rhonda Smith performed the splits while sailing on the rail! Ouch!