Welcome to CSC!

The Cal Sailing Club is a non-profit, volunteer-run sailing club in Berkeley

Membership costs just $99 for 3 months ($89 for students and seniors) plus 2 hours volunteer work and there are no charges for lessons, equipment use, cruises, or other club activities.  Choose About CSC for more information, to join, See plans and pricing.

Once you've signed up, you'll need your Membership #  from your invoice or confirmation email.  If you forget that, check with the dayleader (they have the list of current members) or better yet, login again with your username and password and go to Account Info .  

Welcome aboard! Welcome to CSC!

ABK Windsurfing Camp - Thursday July 26 - Sunday July 29

We've been doing this for several years, but it's different this year. This year's camp is Thursday, July 26, through Sunda7, July 29. It is 4 days, and the club discount is $375 each. The location is the Rio Vista Delta, about an hour from the club. More detailed information on the instruction is here. Andy is one of the best windsurfing instructors in the world and teaches at all levels.

You will be able to camp. There may not be water on site, but town is 10-15 minutes away. 

This year will be more limited than in the past, with a hard limit of 10 people. We may be able to setup a second session from August 2-5.

Payment in advance will be required. You're interested, contact Peter Naulls, and he will supply more details.

CSC Promotional Video - Check it Out

Courtesy Min Lee (his Senior Project).

We're in the Cruising Season!

We've already had several, both keelboat and dinghy. Here's a photo from the recent dinghy cruise to Richmond Marina Bay.

Don't miss out on Club cruises. There will be a lot this year, as a number of Seniors are going for their Cruise Skipper rating, which requires, well, doing cruises. If you're logged into the website, you can go to Activities->Cruising->Cruise List to see what's scheduled. Better is to be on the Cal Sailing Announce email list, where they are announced (see here for how to subscribe).

This is a great Club benefit, sailing to interesting places on the Bay. Go out and do it!

Next Junior Fast Track June 4-8

The next Cal Sailing Fast Track will be held from 6/4 through 6/8 from 5pm to about 9pm.  Fast Track is a week of intensive lessons designed to prepare students to take their Junior Skipper practical test.  There will be testers available later in the week for those who are ready and a hot meal and refreshments will be served each night.

  • To enroll you must finish several prerequisites by dock time on Saturday,  June 2.  These include:
  • Junior Written Test
  • Rigging Test
  • 2 extra volunteer hours (beyond those required for membership)

    It is also strongly recommended that students have had 3 plus lessons, be comfortable handling the main sheet and tiller, and have read the dinghy sailing manual on the club’s website.

You must also commit to showing up all 5 nights (teaching if you pass your test early), helping with cleanup, and contributing $20 for refreshments.

To sign up email Alan Ostreicher, the Fast Track Coordinator. If you do not have email, as the Day Leader to contact Alan.

If more students sign up than we have room for, students will be prioritizes by when they get their prerequisites completed, so don’t wait to long to get them done.

Please contact Alan if you would be so amazingly awesome to want to commit to being head chef one or more nights during the week.  Signup for instructors and testers will be set up later.

 

Windsurf Lessons Now on Summer Schedule

Basic lessons on Saturdays from 10:30 am to 1 pm and on Sundays 11 am to 2pm. More info here. We're getting into the windy season, so come out and learn.

Advanced Dinghy Classes for 2018, Starting May Adv Dinghy Image

Advanced Dinghy will start of Monday,  May 7, and will be held on every Monday evening from then until the end of August, except for US holidays and Fast Track weeks. These classes are intended for Junior Skippers working on their Senior rating. They will cover the required skills and much more. Here are the classes for May:

  • May 7 - Introduction, Follow the Leader
  • May 14 - Sail Trim
  • May 21 - Docking and Man Overboard
  • May 28 (Memorial Day) - Special session with two lessons. 3pm Dodge Ball in dinghies, and 5pm Flying the Spinakker on a JY

Junior Skipper Fast Track Dates for 2018

We will be offering five Junior Skipper Fast Tracks this year. These are 5 day (Monday through Friday) intensive dinghy lessons, 1 on 2, from around 5pm to sunset. They are designed to move you closer to your Junior Skipper rating (which you may even get that week, but even if you don't, you'll be a much better sailor at the end of the week). Details will be announced within a few weeks of the start of each. Participants should have all Junior requirements completed except for the on-the-water test.

These are the dates:

  • April 30 - May 4
  • June 4 - 8
  • June 25 - 29
  • July 30 - August 3
  • August 20 - 24

Open House Dates for 2018

During Open Houses we offer FREE introductory sails to the general public aboard our fleet of keelboats and dinghies. Children must be at least 5 years of age and accompanied by an adult. Each Open House runs from 1-4pm on the dates listed above. More detailed information is here.

Please try to arrive promptly at 1 pm when the signups start.  Depending on the conditions and the amount of people, the sign-up/rides may end before 4pm.Come on down and get out on the bay! Already a member? Come on down and help out! The 2018 Open House Schedule is below:

  • Sunday, February 4
  • Sunday, March 11
  • Saturday, April 14 - Coincides with the Berkeley Bay Festival! 
  • Sunday, May 13
  • Sunday, June 17
  • Sunday, July 15
  • Sunday, August 12
  • Sunday, September 16
  • Sunday, October 14
  • Sunday, November 11

Junior Dinghy Skipper/Windsurfer Tests Now Online

Until now, you had to take your Junior Dinghy Skipper and Junior Windsurfer Written at the Clubhouse. No longer. It's now available on-line. You can take it on the Clubhouse computer or at home. You can also go through the test to prepare yourself before taking it.

You need to be logged in to look at or take the test.

To look at the Junior Skipper Test (you must be logged in):
Go to Ratings->Written Test->Junior Skipper Sailboat->Read Test
To take the test:
Go to Ratings->Written Test->Junior Skipper Sailboat->Take Test

To look at the Junior Wiindsurfer Test (you must be logged in):
Go to Ratings->Written Test->Junior Windsufert->Read Test
To take the test:
Go to Ratings->Written Test->Junior Windsufer->Take Test

Both are closed book, so please honor that and don't look up the answers while you're taking the
test, but feel free to go through the exam ahead of time.

If you pass, that will be recorded automatically, and you will get an email of the results.
If you don't pass, you won't be told what you missed, and you'll have to wait a day to take the test again.

Note that you must take the test online, at the Clubhouse or elsewhere. You can no longer take
it on paper. This gives the Day Leader more time to monitor the South Sailing Basin.

The Novice Windwurfer and Racing Skipper tests have been available online for some time.

 

 

 

 

Sailing Terms

Sailing is full of terminology. Knowing the terms makes learning to sail easier. For example, if someone frantically yells to you, "fall-off," they do not mean to gracelessly dismount from your board. The following terms are used frequently and all windsurfers should know them.

 


Terms can be broken into parts of the sail and rig; parts of the board; points of sail; and directions. These sections are followed by a more or less complete glossary of sailboard terms.


Parts of the sail and rig

The long skinny pole that holds the sail up is the mast. The booms are the two sticks, one on each side of the sail, that hold the sail out from the mast.

Sails have 3 corners (head, tack, clew) and 3 slides (luff, leech, foot):

Three ropes (or 'lines') are attached to the sail. The downhaul pulls the sail down the mast. It is attached to the tack of the sail. It is the most important rope for adjusting the sail. The outhaul pulls the sail out the boom. Finally, your friendly uphaul is the rope that you use to pull the sail up out of the water.

The battens are flexible plastic strips or tubes that hold the shape in the sail.



Parts of the board

The fin (or skeg) and the centerboard provide lateral resistance and keep the board from going sideways. The universal is a flexible joint that attaches the mast to the board. The pointy (foreward) end of the board is the bow, the other (back) end is the stern.



Points of sail

It is necessary to describe the direction a sailboard is travelling, relative to the wind direction. When you start up, you will be on a beam reach. You will notice in the figure below that you cannot sail directly in the direction that the wind is coming from. To get up wind, you will need to sail on a close reach and ziz-zag back and forth (tack). Sailing directly downwind on a run will give you a tippy ride, but is a necessary skill to learn in order to master the jibe.



Directions

Directions on the water can be described in terms relative to the wind, or relative to 'left' and 'right.' Since we've always had trouble with the latter, we will begin with terms relative to the wind.

The direction from where the wind is blowing is windward. The direction away from where the wind is blowing is leeward.To change one's direction to point more toward the wind is to head-up. To change one's direction to point more away from the wind is to fall-off. Now you know when someone frantically yells at you "fall-off," they do not mean hit the suds.

Now it's time for (ugh) left and right. If the wind is coming over the right side of a sailboard, therefore the sailor' right hand is forward, the sailboard is on starboard tack. If the wind is coming over the left side of a sailboard, therefore the sailor' left hand is forward, the sailboard is on port tack.

Sailing directions are important for Rules of the Road which are covered in the 'Start-Up' section of this guide.>




Glossary of Sailing Terms

Apparent wind
The wind that the sailor feels which is the combination of the true wind and the wind caused by the boat's movement through the water.
Battens
Flexible strips or tubes placed in pockets in the sail to hold the sail's shape.
Beam
Widest part of a boat. The point halfway between the bow (front) and stern (rear) of a sailboard.
Beam reach
Sailing at 90 degrees to the wind. Sailing with the wind coming directly over the beam of the board.
Bear off
Same as 'fall off.'
Beat
To sail to windward.
Broad Reach
Sailing with the wind just aft of the beam.
Camber induced sail, Camber inducers
Plastic devices that hold the sail away from the mast so that there is a smooth flow of air across the mast to the sail on both the windward and leeward sides of the sail.
Center of effort (CE)
Point at which all of the force of the wind can be thought to concentrate.
Center of lateral resistance (CLR)
Point at which all of the sideways motion of the board may be thought to be concentrated. On the boards that have centerboards, the CLR is approximately at the centerboard.
Centerboard
A retractable device that, when down, keeps the board from going sideways. Entry-level boards have centerboards. Without a centerboard (in the down position) a novice board will not sail up wind. The centerboard will also steady the board and make balance easier.
Close reach
The point of sail between close-hauled and a beam reach.
Come about, tack
To change direction so that the sail is flown in the opposite side by turning through the eye of the wind.
Downhaul
Line that is used to pull down the mast. On modern sailboards, correct tension in the downhaul is the most critical sail adjustment. See how to rig sails section.
Eye of the wind
Direction from which the wind is blowing.
Fall off
No this does not mean jump off your board. It means to change direction so as to point farther away from where the wind is coming from.
Head up
Change direction so as to point closer to where the wind is coming from.
Jibe
To change direction so that the sail is flown on the opposite side by turning away from the wind.
Leeward
Direction away from the wind. In the Rules of the Road, the leeward boat is the one farthest from where the wind is coming from.
Outhaul
Line that us used to attach the sail to the end of the boom.
Uphaul
(1) Pull the sail out of the water. (2) The line that sailors use to pull the sail out of the water.
Port tack
In the normal sailing stance, sailing a course with the left hand in front. The wind will be coming from the left (port) side of the board. Port tack boat must stay out of the way of starboard tack boat.
Rotating asymmetrical foil (RAF) sails
Full batten sails without camber inducers. The batten tucks part way behind the mast so that there is a smooth airflow on the leeward side of the sail. Usually less expensive than camber induced sails.
Rules of the road
Rules that govern right-of-way when two boats meet (`boats' includes windsurfers)
Running
Sailing in the same direction as the wind.
Sheet in
Pull the sail in by pulling in with the back hand. On a boat, the sheet is the line (rope) that controls the sail. Boat sailors control the sail by pulling on the sheet. Windsurfers sheet the sail primarily with their back hand.
Sheet out
The opposite of sheet in.
Skeg, fin
The small fluke or appendage in the water at the stern of the board that keeps the board going straight. Do not attempt to sail a board without a skeg.
Starboard tack
In the normal sailing stance, sailing a course with the right hand in front. The wind will be coming from the right (starboard) side of the board. If two sailboats or sailboards meet, the one on starboard tack has the right-of-way.
Windward
Direction toward the wind. The windward boat is the one closest where the wind is coming from.
Universal
The joint that connects the mast to the board. It can rotate in all directions, hence universal.